The CI/CD and DevOps Blog

Manaswini Sawant

Recent Posts

Shippable offers OpenShift customers blazing fast CI/CD service

Shippable is pleased to announce that we now offer OpenShift customers our blazing fast, hosted CI/CD service. OpenShift customers can now choose the simplicity of using a true SaaS solution instead of spending the Gears to host a CI server themselves (not to mention further engineering time configuring and maintaining their CI system).
Shippable will (soon) be available through RedHat's OpenShift Marketplace.
You can try Shippable's service (in BETA) on OpenShift right now at openshift.shippable.com

Shippable now supports BitBucket!

As we promised at our launch, the Shippable engineering team has been working crazy hours to add new features. 

Many of the features we add are by user request.  If you would like to suggest a feature or enhancement, head on over to Shippable support and file an issue.

Shippable started off being tightly integrated with Github - as it was the cloud repository of choice, especially for open source projects. When it comes to private repos however, BitBucket has become a popular alternative to Github.

So one very common user request we received at Shippable was - to add support for BitBucket. And when our users speak, the Shippable team listens....

We are happy to announce that Shippable now supports BitBucket


Have container...will ship (or why Shippable uses containers)

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Recently, Shippable was listed in the top 10 startups built on docker. Of the top 10 startups listed, Shippable is the only startup using Docker to do continuous integration and deployment.

Docker of course, is the open source Linux container engine and in a future post, we will talk about why Shippable chose Docker.

Good commits come in small sizes......

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Dr Dobbs Journal has a great post in praise of small commits. As Jeff Ma points out, small commits have multiple benefits -

  • Smaller commits = Less code complexity = easier to understand = easier to test and debug
  • Smaller commits = faster code reviews = quicker feedback from reviewers
  • Quicker feedback from reviewers = less (mental) context switching for the developer

As Jeff says -

In a continuous integration environment, the speed at which commits are tested, added to the build, and possibly reverted is paramount. Builds are also faster for small commits because they are, by nature, smaller. Faster and more frequent builds translates into getting the product out faster and getting feedback more quickly. And because the commit is small, if you need to revert back to an earlier version of a build, that is also easier to do. An added benefit is that if you need to remove a commit that has a small scope of functionality, only that piece needs to be removed from the build, which leaves other features intact.

You can check out how Shippable can help you #shipcodefaster!

How many engineers does it take to…….?

NX_worker_team_pullingrope

Mary and Tom Poppendieck in their book Implementing Lean Software Development ask -

"How long would it take your organization to deploy a change that involves just one single line of code? Do you do this on a repeatable, reliable basis?"

You can also ask the very same question in a different way - how many engineers does it take to deploy a single line of code change? (and how much time will it take them?)

Just a sample of the questions you need to ask before coming up with an answer to that question -

How much testing will you be required to perform?

How much supporting documentation will you be required to produce?

How long will you have to wait for a test environment?

How many dependent systems will you need to test?

How long will it take to approve the change?

And, last but not least, how many of those activities add value, and how many waste time?

As Martin Fowler tweets -

https://twitter.com/martinfowler/status/437913623118090241