The CI/CD and DevOps Blog

Kubernetes Tutorial: how to pull a private docker image in a pod

Docker images that comprise a production application are often deployed to private repositories in Docker registries. Kubernetes provides a feature called imagePullSecrets that allows pods to pull private docker images. In this blog, we demonstrate how you can easily hookup imagePullSecrets to your pod using Shippable.

 

Creating an imagePullSecrets secret

imagePullSecrets is a type of a Kubernete Secret whose sole purpose is to pull private images from a Docker registry. It allows you to specify the Url of the docker registry, credentials for logging in and the image name of your private docker image.

There are two ways an imagePullSecrets can be created.

1. kubectl create secret docker-registry command. We use this approach in our blog.

ambarishs-MacBook-Pro:gke ambarish$ kubectl create secret docker-registry private-registry-key --docker-username="devopsrecipes" --docker-password="xxxxxx" --docker-email="[email protected]" --docker-server="https://index.docker.io/v1/"
secret "private-registry-key" created

 

2. Creating the secret via a yml.

In this approach, a config.json file is created for the private registry. Its contents are then base64 encoded and specified in the .dockerconfigjson property.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: private-registry-key
  namespace: default
data:
  .dockerconfigjson: UmVhbGx5IHJlYWxseSByZWVlZWVlZWVlZWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWFhYWxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGx5eXl5eXl5eXl5eXl5eXl5eXl5eSBsbGxsbGxsbGxsbGxsbG9vb29vb29vb29vb29vb29vb29vb29vb29vb25ubm5ubm5ubm5ubm5ubm5ubm5ubm5ubmdnZ2dnZ2dnZ2dnZ2dnZ2dnZ2cgYXV0aCBrZXlzCg==
type: kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson

 

Kubernetes Tutorial: Using Secrets In Your Application

Applications deployed to a Kubernetes cluster often need access to sensitive information such as credentials to access a database and authentication tokens to make authenticated API calls to services. Kubernetes allows you to specify such sensitive information cleanly in an object called a Secret. This avoids putting sensitive data in a Pod defintion or a docker image. In this blog, we demonstrate how you can easily hookup Kubernetes Secrets to your pod using Shippable.

 

Creating a Kubernetes Secret

Secrets are defined in a yml file in a Secret object. A Secret object can specifiy multiple secrets in name-value pairs. Each secret has to be base64 encoded before specifying it in the yml.

Let's define an API token as a secret for a fake token xxx-xxx-xxx.

1. Base 64 encode the token.

ambarishs-MacBook-Pro:sources ambarish$ echo -n "xxx-xxx-xxx" | base64
eHh4LXh4eC14eHg=

2. Create the secrets yml called create-secret.yml.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: auth-token-secret
type: Opaque
data:
  AUTH_TOKEN_VALUE: eHh4LXh4eC14eHg=

3. Create the secret in the kubernetes cluster using kubectl.

$ kubectl create -f secrets.yml
secret "auth-token" created

Kubernetes Tutorial: Attaching A Volume Mount To Your Application

Kubernetes allows you to package multiple containers into a pod. All containers in the pod run on the same Nodeshare the IP address and port space, and can find each other via localhost. To share data between pods, Kubernetes has an abstraction called Volumes. In this blog, we demonstrate how you can  easily hookup Kubernetes Volumnes to your pod and define the containers in the pod using Shippable.

 

Kuberetes Volumes

A Volume is a directory with data that is accessible to all containers running in a pod and gets mounted into each containers filesystem. Its lifetime is identical to the lifetime of the pod. Decoupling the volume lifetime from the container lifetime allows the volume to persist across container crashes and restarts. Volumes further can be backed by host's filesystem, by persistent block storage volumes such as AWS EBS or a distributed file system. The complete list of the different types of volumes that Kubernetes supports can be found here.

Shippable supports mounting all the types of volumes that Kubernetes supports via the dockerOptions resource. However, the specific volume type that we demonstrate in this blog is a gitRepo volume. A gitRepo volume mounts a directory into each containers filesystem and clones a git repository into it. 

Declarative Continuous Deployment Pipelines with Docker

Everyone agrees that continuous deployment helps accelerate innovation. However, Continuous Deployment (CD) today is synonymous with fragile homegrown solutions made of disjointed tools cobbled together with thousands of lines of imperative scripts. Avi Cavale walks you through the CD maturity model and demos an end to end continuous deployment with declarative pipelines for Docker applications.

This video was taken at the Docker Seattle Meetup, hosted by Tune.

Docker applications with Google Container Registry and Shippable

     

We are very excited to announce support for Google Container Registry (GCR) integration with Shippable’s CI/CD cloud platform!

Our support for building and deploying Docker-based applications combined with Google's new private registry service make this a fantastic combination for anyone looking to accelerate their Docker development efforts.  

Many of you already use our custom workflows for Docker applications that let you quickly move from committing code changes to having validated Docker images ready to deploy.  With Google Container Registry (GCR), you can now manage those Docker images with secure, private Docker image storage on Google Cloud Platform, known for consistent uptime and security.  Additionally, GCR provides additional benefits we think you will like, such as fine grained access control, server-side encryption of images, and super fast deployment to Google Container Engine and Google Compute Engine.  Once stored in GCR, you can easily access the images from any machine for use in a variety of scenarios, including deploying to Google Compute Engine (GCE) via Google Container Engine (GKE), deploying to AWS, or pulling to local machines using the Docker command line interface.

Via this integration, we have enabled the following activities with GCR:

  • Pull private images stored on GCR to use as basis for a continuous integration (CI) run

  • Push an image to GCR resulting from a successful CI run (i.e. after building and testing a source code change)

  • Pull a private image stored on GCR to use as the base image for a Dockerfile build

The above options are available on all Shippable plans at no additional charge.